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Courses

Our faculty bring their own cutting-edge research into the classroom and introduce students to an array of interpretative approaches and to pressing issues and questions in the discipline. Students enjoy a rich learning experience in the classroom, where the faculty instructs them in an integrated process of active learning, engaged looking and critical thinking and writing.

Course Catalogues

See the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs for a full list of our course offerings and Testudo for our current courses.

Degree Program Requirements

Please consult the program pages for requirements about each degree:

Spring 2022 Courses

Undergraduate Spring 2022 Courses

ARTH200 Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe to the Mediterranean (Professor Gensheimer) 

TuTh 11-11:50 + section (ASY 2203)ARTH 200 is designed to introduce you to some of the principal works of ancient and medieval Western art and architecture.  Throughout the semester, we will examine art created in two and three dimensions, including sculpture, architecture, and painting.  This course adopts a chronological approach to the study of, and intersections between, art and society in ancient and medieval Europe and the Mediterranean.  We begin with the art of ancient Egypt and end with developments in the Middle Ages.  We emphasize the historical, religious, political, social, and cultural contexts of the works studied; the relationship of the works of art to the society that created them; and the interrelationships of these societies as seen through their material and visual culture.

Poster

 

Ellington Robinsson, Oath of the Imperialists, 2013. CAPP Contemporary Art Collection, Stamp Student Union, University of Maryland

ARTH201 Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present (Professor Shannon)

MW 9-9:50 + section (ASY 2203)
What is a human being? What is the purpose of life? How should human beings relate to one another, to the natural world, and to the cosmos? Taking the history of art to be a history of efforts to answer such questions, this course introduces students to art made in Europe and North America over the past 500 years.

Poster
 

 

Myoung Ho Lee, Tree…#7, 2014

ARTH265 How (and Why) to Look at Art in the Era of Climate Change (Professor Shannon)

MW 11-11:50 + section (ASY 2203)
The earth is now more than 1° C warmer than before industrialization, and the drastic effects of climate change are more pronounced each year. Certainly we need technological and political innovation to low and reverse climate change and to ameliorate its effects, but how can art, too, provide unique help to us in meeting the challenge of climate change? This course considers selected art works, mostly from the last 100 years, that invite us to think creatively about the relationship between human beings and the non-human world. As we look closely at these innovative art works, we will ask: what ideas, beliefs, and values can we draw from them to help us build the mindset of a truly sustainable civilization?

Poster

 

 

ARTH 301 composite banner

ARTH301 Aegean Art and Archaeology (Professor Egan)

TuTh 9:30-10:45 (ASY 3215)
This course will introduce you to the artifacts and monuments of Bronze Age Greece (ca. 3000-1000 BCE) through study of archaeological excavations on Crete, the Aegean islands, and the Greek mainland. We will explore the range of artistic choices made by some of the world’s earliest craftsmen and investigate how objects and buildings connect to early Greek society, politics, and religion. In this course, you will not only learn to think critically about ancient art and architecture in context, but will see how deep antiquity has distinct and clear echoes in our modern world.

Poster

 

 

Hagia Sophia, interior

ARTH313 Medieval Art: Cultural Exchanges in the Byzantine World (Professor Georgievska-Shine)

TuTh 2-3:15 (ASY 3211)
Focuses on the art and architecture from the eastern Mediterranean, specifically, the Byzantine empire. Our broad focus will be on the formation and evolution of the visual arts in Byzantium as a result of exchanges with various cultural, ethnic, and religious entities and traditions. In this context, we will be looking at the legacy of the Graeco-Roman past, contacts with Islamic world, as well as with people and cultures along the periphery of Byzantium: from the Balkan peninsula, to Sicily and Russia.

Poster

 

 

Leonardo, detail of Cartoon of Mary, Elizabeth, Christ and John the Baptist

ARTH324 Leonardo's World: Art and Experience in Renaissance Italy (Professor Georgievska-Shine)

TuTh 3:30-4:45 (ASY 3211)
Widely regarded as one of the most groundbreaking Renaissance artists, Leonardo da Vinci epitomized the ideal of a universal man, for whom mastery of art was also a way of mastering knowledge about the world in all of its facets. Though he was exceptional in terms of his accomplishments, his aspirations were part of a cultural mindset as well. In this course, we look at his work within that broader context and in relation to some of the other major artists of the late fifteenth- and the sixteenth centuries, such as Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.

Poster

 

 

Angie Dickinson and Lee Marvin in Point Blank

ARTH359O Film as Art; Film, Gazes and Points of View (Professor Metcalf)

W 3:30-7 (ASY 3215)
Films have a “Point of View” that is constructed through different elements of form and narrative, from where the camera is placed to who is writing the script. This POV – or “the gaze” -- tells us “who we are” when watching a film (or look at a painting). We will explore Laura Mulvey’s original theory of the gaze from the 1970s and then consider how – or if – it changes in films up to the present day, exploring literal points of view, subjective and unreliable narrative, the way films make us Identify with the “wrong” characters, define normality, the way changing a POV changes meaning, and the how the same story changes over time, across cultures or between directors.

Poster

 

 

Jacob Lawrence Migration Series, #52 (One of the Largest Race Riots occurred in East St. Louis)

ARTH361 American Art from Civil War to Civil Rights (Professor Korobkin)

TuTh 11-12:15 (ASY 3211)
ARTH 361 explores diverse artistic movements and makers in the United States, beginning at the end of the Civil War in 1865 and concluding with the art of Civil Rights era in the 20th century. We will ask how the visual arts construct and challenge formations of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the context of social movements and political transformations.  This course emphasizes the practice of close looking as we encounter works art across a range of media—photography, painting, sculpture, film, material culture, performance art and public art.

Poster

 

 

Composite of two works of African art

ARTH376 Living Arts of Africa (Professor Tervala)

M 4-6:20 (ASY 3215)
This course surveys art from the African continent, focusing its attention on the ways that artists, artworks, and artmaking played a role in the functioning of day-to-day life. From Stone Age cave paintings to contemporary performance art, this course will stretch across 10,000+ years of human history and will span the length of the world’s second largest continent. We will proceed historically in order to identify and examine the defining artistic traits of each individual age and will pay close attention to the interactions between various cultures, states, societies, and people. Of course, there is no one ‘African’ style; the art of Africa, like the art of any place, is dynamic, ever changing and situation specific. Thus, our method of approach will be via case studies; each week we will examine the art of a different state, society, or culture. This introduction to the academic study of art in Africa is meant to inspire a continued interest and investment in African affairs by introducing students to the ways that politics, economics, religion, and individual self-fashioning are inextricably linked to artmaking and creative expression.

Poster

 

ARTH386 Experiential Learning

Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Art History & Archaeology department.
Restriction: 
Junior standing or higher.
Supervised internship experience in diverse areas of art historical, archaeological, and museological work.
Contact department for information to register for this course.

 

 

 

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon poster

ARTH391 Transnational Chinese Cinema (Professor Kuo)

M 1-3:30 (TWS 1313)
Transnational Chinese cinema has made a big impact on contemporary world film culture. This course will introduce students to the films directed by some of the most representative filmmakers working in different geopolitical locations (mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong) and the Chinese diaspora. The films of these directors, in a spectrum of genres, themes, and styles, have inspired global scholarship, not only in visual culture and cinema, but also in the study of women’s issues, gender and ethnic studies, as well as the fields of adaptation and intermedia studies. Students will explore these films in their socio-historical and artistic contexts, considering the influences and innovations that have shaped them and analyzing their reception by audiences and critics. 

Poster

 

 

poster for Dragon Inn by King Hu

ARTH484 Modern Chinese Film and Visual Culture (Professor Kuo)

MW 2-3:15 (JMZ 1122)
Cinema is arguably the most influential global art form of the twentieth century. Within a year of its invention in the West, in 1896, it reached China,  and since then has become an indispensable part of the social, political, and cultural life of the Chinese people.  In this course, we will explore modern Chinese film and visual culture to examine topics such as modernity; tradition versus modernization; cultural nationalism; and Chinese responses to Western visual culture. We will examine works representative of Chinese film in both their local, Chinese context and that of worldwide cinema. We will consider how modern Chinese films and visual culture have been shaped by traditional Chinese aesthetic sensibilities and art forms as well as by foreign influences.

For Info, Email Professor Kuo at jck@umd.edu

Poster

 

 

Dorothea Lange - Portrait of Florence Owens Thompson - detail

ARTH488D Colloquium in Art History; Mining the Visual Culture of the Great Depression (Professor Korobkin)

TuTh 2-3:15 (ASY 3217)
During the Great Depression, economic crises, environmental disasters, and social movements transformed American life. This class focuses on the visual culture of this period –from documentary photography and public murals to cinema and modern design. In addition to examining iconic works by artists like Dorothea Lange and Diego Rivera, we will engage local archives of photographs, posters, artist papers and other primary sources from the 1930s. Students in this seminar will not only explore a critical era in American visual culture but also reflect on how we form and use archives to shape our understanding of the past.

Poster

 

 

Demas Nwoko, Folly, 1960

ARTH488M Colloquium in Art History; African Modernism in America: Decolonization, Civil Rights and the Cold War (Professor Lathrop)

W 9-11:30 (ASY 3217)
1960 was heralded as “The Year of Africa,” marking the independence of seventeen African nations from European colonialism. Decolonization movements in Africa resonated internationally—with the colonized world across the Global South and with Black Americans fighting for their own freedoms in the United States. With independence, artists in Africa developed new visual languages that drew on both indigenous traditions and the global avant-garde. The exhibition of this new work in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s, supported by (occasionally covert) Cold War-era cultural diplomacy, encouraged American audiences to recognize their shared aesthetic and political concerns and challenged assumptions about African art in the postwar era. Based on an exhibition that will travel to the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC in 2023, this class will ask students to virtually curate galleries in the museum based on the histories and artists discussed.

Poster

 

ARTH498 (PermReq) Directed Studies in Art History I. Individual Instruction Course

TBD
Audit. Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH499 (PermReq) Honors Thesis. Individual Instruction Course 

TBD 
Audit. Contact department for information to register for this course.

Graduate Spring 2022 Courses

ARTH 708 poster

ARTH708: Seminar in Ancient Art and Archaeology: Painting the Wine-Dark Sea: Mural Traditions in Bronze Age Greece

Professor Emily Egan
Thursday 12:30-3 (ASY 4304)

This course explores the tradition of wall painting in Bronze Age Greece, ca. 3000-1100 BCE. Discussions will investigate murals in their archaeological and social contexts and consider larger questions of iconographic choice and transmission, tools and technology, color and pigments, and the issues surrounding modern restorations and reconstructions.

Poster

 

ARTH768: Seminar in Latin American Art and Archaeology

Professor Abigail McEwen
Wednesday 3-5:30 (ASY 4304)

 

 

Studiolo

ARTH789C: Selected Topics in Art History; At Home with Things

Professor Elizabeth Honig
Friday 12-2:30 (ASY 4304)

This seminar will look at objects in domestic settings during the early modern period, principally c. 1500-1650, considering the material nature of domesticity in England, The Netherlands, and Italy. Our exploration will cover rooms from kitchen to study, from bedroom to reception chamber. We will think about objects of use and objects for show, things that are gifted between persons and things intensely personal to a single individual, small things worn on the body and large things rooted in a specific household location. Objects that are mundane will be as important to our investigation as things that are rare and precious. We will consider things that are made at home by family members, and locally by craftsmen, but also things being imported from other parts of the globe and domesticized within the home. The storage, arrangement, and display of objects will also be important issues.

The class will draw on the practices and questions of multiple disciplines including literary studies, anthropology, cultural geography, and art history. We will consider the variety of ways and contexts in which objects have been understood to 'speak' as aesthetic vehicles and as cultural texts. We will be particularly interested in the different ways we get access to domestic material culture, how this changes between locations, and how that affects the way we as historians think and write about the history of objects: some cultures have abundant literary descriptions, now studied as part of the “material turn” in literary scholarship; others have many pictorial representations of domestic environments; still others have extensive (and published) inventories. Which objects as treated in these sources still exist today as objects, and how does the historical discourse surrounding them alter the ways we study them as objects?

 

ARTH798

(Perm Req)
Directed Graduate Studies in Art History
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH799

(Perm Req)
Master's Thesis Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH898

(Perm Req)
Pre-Candidacy Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH899

(Perm Req)
Doctoral Dissertation Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.

Fall 2021 Courses

Undergraduate Fall 2021 Courses

ARTH200 Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean Fall 2021

ARTH200 Art and Society in Ancient and Medieval Europe to the Mediterranean (Professor Egan) 

TuTh 11-11:50 + section (ASY 2203)
This course examines the material culture and visual expressions of Mediterranean and European societies from early times until ca. 1300 CE, emphasizing the political, social, and religious context of the works studied, the relationships of the works to the societies that created them, and the interrelationship of those societies.

Poster

ARTH201 Art and Society Western Europe Renaissance to Contemporary Fall 2021

ARTH201 Art and Society in the West from the Renaissance to the Present (Professor Mansbach)

MW 9-9:50 + section (ASY 2203)
Examines representative European and American works of art from the later Middle Ages to the present, highlighting the dynamic exchange between artistic and cultural traditions both within periods and across time.

Poster

ARTH260 Art and Activism (Professor McEwen)

ARTH260 Art and Activism Fall 2021

MW 10-10:50 + section (ASY 2203)
Can art affect social change? How may we use the history of radical and avant-garde art to inform present-day movements and models of artistic and creative activism? This course explores the modern and contemporary history of political art and arts activism on local, national, and global scales.

Poster

ARTH261 Monuments Monumentality and Art of Memorial Fall 2021

ARTH261 Monuments Monumentality, and the Art of the Memorial (Professor Korobkin)

MW 11-11:50 + section (ASY 2203)
Why do societies create monuments? And why do they change and remove them? How do monuments shape historical narratives, embody cultural values, and become sites of mourning and protest? This course investigates the political and cultural work of monuments across time and space, from ancient Egypt to European empires to the contemporary United States. The issues we consider include memory and memorialization, race and representation, and appropriation and iconoclasm.

Poster

ARTH303 Roman Art and Archaeology (Professor Gensheimer)

TuTh 9:30-10:45 (ASY 3215)
AT THE HEIGHT OF ITS POWER, the Roman Empire stretched from Britain to Morocco and from Spain to Syria. Rome itself, initially a small and unimportant town, grew into a major megalopolis that not only ruled its vast empire but set the pattern for a sophisticated urban style of living for over one thousand years. This class will explore the architectural remains of ancient Rome, both within the city and throughout the breadth of its Empire. Grandiose Roman architecture – temples, fora, triumphal arches, theaters, and baths, among other examples – along with the quotidian building blocks of the Empire – bridges, aqueducts, and roads – will be evaluated. Emphasis is placed on studying Roman art and architecture within historical, political, social, and religious contexts and changes. Questions of patronage (imperial, elite, middle and lower classes) and function (public, domestic, and funerary) will also be
considered.

Poster

ARTH305 Archaeological Methods and Practice (Instructor TBD)
TuTh 2-3:15 (SQH 1103)

ARTH330 Seventeenth Century European Fall 2021

ARTH330 Seventeenth-Century European Art (Professor Honig)

TuTh 3:30-4:45
The arts of Baroque Europe as seen through the eyes of Peter Paul Rubens, scholar, diplomat, and artist. Travel with him to the Italy of Caravaggio and the Spain of Velazquez; listen in on the court intrigues of Marie de’ Medici’s Paris; watch the new Dutch Republic formulate an identity through art; attempt to visually justify the rule of an English king who would shortly lose his head. Learn how to create visual propaganda for the triumphant counter-reformation Catholic church. Study classical art and literature through his lens. And examine how an incredibly busy man like Rubens ran his studio as a massive home-based enterprise.

Poster

ARTH351 Picturing Contemporary Life Art Since 1945 Fall 2021

ARTH351 Picturing Contemporary Life: Art Since 1945 (Professor Shannon)

TuTh 11-12:15 (ASY 3215)
This course offers an overview of advanced art since 1945, emphasizing developments in North America and Europe, and addressing painting, sculpture, photography, video, installation art, and other media. The class encourages students to view art in its historical contexts, seeing it as means of representing and thinking through social and cultural concerns. Themes will include the human body and its relationships to social justice, changing forms of urban space, the roles of art institutions, the global economy, and climate change. Some meetings will be devoted broadly to movements, others to specific artists. Frequent in-class discussions will complement the lectures.

Poster

ARTH359V Seeing Through Films How Movies Mean Fall 2021

ARTH359V Film as Art; Seeing Through Art: How Films Mean (Professor Metcalf)

W 3:30-7 (ASY 4213A)
This course explores how Hollywood entertainment films have meanings beyond their plots. Students will learn how to analyze the totality of how a film tells its story as they explore the way directors use film form and film conventions to create films with multiple meanings, undermine the film story, comment on film genre and stardom, create films out of other films, explicate philosophical ideas, and to create films that change meanings depending upon the culture and expectations of the audience. Films to be discussed include Baby Driver, Point Blank, Being There, Ocean’s Thirteen, Her, Total Recall, Invasion of the Bodysnatchers, Mad Max: Thunder Road, Barry Lyndon, Mr. Baseball, Hateful Eight, Gambit, The Postman Always Rings Twice, and The Matador.

Poster

ARTH362 20th Century African-American Art Fall 2021

ARTH362 Twentieth-Century African-American Art (Professor Saggese)

TuTh 9:30-10:45 (ASY 3215)
This course looks critically at African-American and African diaspora art, focusing particularly on works made after 1960. Organized chronologically, this class will provide students with a more thorough understanding of this period of art, as well as the overall connection of visual material to the social, the political, and the aesthetic frames of its production. We will study the ways in which African-American visual production has been shaped by larger discourses about American art, but has also responded to the very real circumstances of racial exclusion in both the mainstream art world and larger society. Students will also have a chance to interact directly with the collection of the David C. Driskell Center at the University of Maryland  throughout the semester.

Image: Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, To Douse the Devil for a Ducat, 2015, oil on canvas

Poster

ARTH386 Experiential Learning

Prerequisite: Permission of ARHU-Art History & Archaeology department.
Restriction: 
Junior standing or higher.
Supervised internship experience in diverse areas of art historical, archaeological, and museological work.
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH389 Transformations of Images and Ideas: The Case of Classical Mythology Fall 2021

ARTH389 Special Topics in Art History and Archaeology: Transformations of Images and Ideas: The Case of Classical Mythology

(Professor Georgievska-Shine)
TuTh 11-12:15 (ASY 3211)
One of the most significant facets of the “rebirth” of antiquity during the early modern era was the renewed interest in the meaning of classical myths among philosophers, theologians, men of letters, and visual artists. Greek and Roman divinities and the lore associated with them could be studied through a variety of ancient literary sources. The most influential classical authority throughout this period, however, was the Roman poet Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso) whose fifteen-book poem The Metamorphoses served as a veritable “Pagan Bible” for painters and poets alike. This course explores the ways in which the stories contained in this “perpetual poem” were represented in the European visual arts between 1400 and 1700.

By the end of this course students will gain a deeper understanding about the main Ovidian themes in Renaissance and Baroque art and greater proficiency in “reading” paintings and sculptures in general.  At the same time, by analysing different styles and symbolic meanings in visual renderings of pagan myths, they will become more conversant with the changing perspectives on the world of antiquity during the early modern period.

Poster

ARTH389O Special Topics in Art History and Archaeology; Activist and Critical Art in Contemporary Iran (Professor Moosavi)

MW 2-3:15 (JMZ 1122)

ARTH392 Contemporary Chinese Art and Film Fall 2021

ARTH392 Contemporary Chinese Art and Film (Professor Kuo)

TuTh 9:30-10:45 (ASY 3211)
Through an in-depth study of representative contemporary Chinese artists and film makers, the course will examine how they navigate the complex relationship between art and society and how they find the balance between the indigenous roots of their art and the global capitalist economy and marketplace.

Students will consider a wide range of art forms (painting, photography, video, installation, web-based media, and film) in four broad themes (uses of the past; critiques of power; representations of race, gender, and sexuality; socially engaged art) and explore the complex intertwining of the political, historical, and aesthetic aspects in Chinese contemporary art and film, as well as the multiple contexts in which these art works are created and circulated.

For information, email Professor Kuo at jck@umd.edu

Poster

ARTH488C Contemporary Chinese and Chinese-American Cinema on Women Fall 2021

ARTH488C Colloquium in Art History; Contemporary Chinese and Chinese American Cinema on Women (Professor Kuo)

TuTh 12:30-1:45 (ASY 3217)
This course examines critically the representation of Chinese and Chinese-American women in contemporary cinema from mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Chinese diaspora. The changing images of women in a spectrum of genres, by some of the most representative directors, will be studied through the application of major critical concepts in visual culture and cinema studies.

For Info, Email Professor Kuo at jck@umd.edu

Poster

ARTH488U Colloquium in Art History; The Archaeology of Color (Professor Egan)

TuTh 2-3:15 (ASY 3217)
This colloquium explores the concept of color in the ancient Greco-Roman world from prehistory to the height of the Roman Empire. We will trace where, when, how different hues were employed in movable works (in stone, clay, wood, etc.) and in the built environment, examine accounts of visual perception and pigments by ancient authors, evaluate modern modes of excavation, analysis, interpretation, and reconstruction, and grapple with complex issues surrounding the longstanding ideal of a “white-marble” Classical past.

Poster

ARTH489V Special Topics in Art History; Markets and Collecting (Professor Weil)

Th 11:30-2 (JMZ 3122)

Cross-listed with ARTT489C. Credit granted for ARTT489C or ARTH489V.

ARTH498 (PermReq) Directed Studies in Art History I. Individual Instruction Course

TBD
Audit. Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH499 (PermReq) Honors Thesis. Individual Instruction Course 

TBD 
Audit. Contact department for information to register for this course.

Graduate Fall 2021 Courses

ARTH692 Methods of Art History Fall 2021

ARTH692: Methods of Art History

Professor Jordana Saggese
Thursday 12:30-3 (EDU 3236)

This course is a survey of the key texts, thinkers, concepts, and theoretical approaches that influence the study of visual culture and the production of criticism. It is an opportunity for students to engage with the ideas that are deployed in these conversations, while gaining the ability to use these resources in their own work. The course is by design interdisciplinary, drawing upon the theoretical advances made in fields as diverse as philosophy, linguistics, art history, psychoanalysis, and literary studies. We also attend to how these discourses are creatively transformed by those working within feminist and/or queer theoretical frameworks. The guiding thesis of this course is that the visual is situated within larger fields of cultural production, which require carefully defined strategies to make explicit their ontological, epistemological, historical, and political assumptions.

Image: Presidio Modelo, Cuba, built 1926-1968

For all non-Art History and Archaeology majors, permission of the department is required. 

Poster

ARTH759G: Seminar in Twentieth-Century Art; Modern Art & Portraiture: Imagining the Human Being

Professor Joshua Shannon
Tuesday 2-4:30 (ASY 4213A)

For centuries, portraiture was one of the dominant genres of European painting, and in the nineteenth century it became a major form in painting and photography worldwide. While contemporary art has relatively little interest in portraits, people today make and use them often in everyday life. The portrait--along with the changes in its forms, popularity, and uses--is a guide into the history of the concept of the human being. This graduate seminar considers the long history of portraiture, with an emphasis on modern and contemporary developments. While looking closely at individual works of art, we will also consider changing beliefs regarding individualism, social collectivity, power, gender, race, soulfulness, belonging, etc. Students are invited to write research essays situated in any time period and any part of the world.

Poster

ARTH789C: Selected Topics in Art History; Sculpture: Process, Object, Publics

Professor Tess Korobkin
Monday 1:30-4 (ASY 4213A)

This seminar explores key developments in the history, theory and practice of sculpture from the Victorian era to the present. Focusing primarily on Britain and the United States, and their empires, the course will take a case study approach, examining the changing aesthetic priorities and theoretical debates that underpinned conceptions about sculpture and its role in the world. Key issues include authorship and reproduction, the relation of sculpture to industry, sites and modes of display, the politics of monuments, and sculpture’s audiences. Several trips to DC, including to the Smithsonian American Art Museum and National Mall are planned.

Poster

ARTH798

(Perm Req)
Directed Graduate Studies in Art History
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH799

(Perm Req)
Master's Thesis Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH898

(Perm Req)
Pre-Candidacy Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.

ARTH899

(Perm Req)
Doctoral Dissertation Research
Contact department for information to register for this course.